Saturday, February 25, 2017

The 2017 OSCARS On THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER MAG!!!



THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER got 19 HOLLYWOOD A-LISTERS attempt to explain, Why the OSCARS STILL MATTER, and/or; WHY The OSCARS NO LONGER Matter, in the 2017 OSCARS ISSUE of THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER Magazine!!!


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GAYLE KING said;
"I lived in Turkey when I was a kid, from first grade to sixth grade, so I didn't grow up thinking, "I've got to watch the Oscars." In my early 20s was when I started watching it — and I've just been hooked ever since.
The first time I got to go was [in 1986] when Oprah was nominated for best supporting actress in The Color Purple. And it was just dazzling. We were in L.A. that weekend, and everyone kept coming up to her and saying, "You're going to win. I voted for you." And I believed it. She was petrified and mortified because she had this dress, and the day before the Oscars [she tried it on and] it was too big. So she asked the tailor to come and take it in. He then made it too small. And she discovered that an hour before the show. So she was sitting there thinking, "Please don't call my name, please don't call my name, please don't call my name." Because of her dress! Prizzi's Honor won that year: Anjelica Huston, also a very good performance. But I really thought Oprah had it because so many people stopped her."



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Scientist NEIL DeGRASSE TYSON said;
"The Oscars matter because they give us all something to argue about other than our political differences.



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LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA said;
"My brain is a compendium of Oscar moments: Tom Hanks' beautiful acceptance speech when he won best actor for Philadelphia in 1994. Roberto Benigni climbing over chairs and wanting to make love to everybody in the world when Life Is Beautiful won best foreign-language film in 1999. Kim Basinger presenting in 1990 and telling the audience that one of the best films of the year, Do the Right Thing, was not nominated. For her to take a stand, 25 years before #OscarsSoWhite, was incredible — and impressive because time has shown the prescience of that film.
I expect we'll see more of that this year. It's a political time, so I imagine the Oscars will look exactly like your Twitter or Facebook feed. Why should we ignore for three hours what we're talking about 24 hours a day?
The Oscars were always a family affair when I was a kid. One sort of unintentional tradition we had every year was during the "In Memoriam" part of the show. My family called it the "She died?" section because my dad, who is pop culture-oblivious, would always go, "She died? He died? She died?!" the whole time. So, it was very sad and yet also very funny watching my dad catch up."
-CCG

1 comment:


  1. La La Land, a much hyped musical tribute to the Hollywood film industry, is expected to win the lion's share of gold at the 89th annual Academy Awards in a staged event eclipsing several superior films and performances. The main reason for this was money, big bucks money from across the Pacific.

    One might say the way the Democratic Party ran its primary campaign seems to mirror the annual Oscar campaigns...hyping up one candidate irregardless of its shortcomings and to the detriment of better candidates or in this case, movies.

    This year's anointed candidate was La La Land, a good film, not a great musical, another example of Hollywood hype to earn more more money for its investors, one of which is TIK Films, a subsidiary of Chinese broadcast giant Hunan Broadcast Intermediary.

    Hollywood is drooling over the Chinese these days at the thought of them financing more and more of American movies, and this one in particular is a musical commercial promotion of the the Hollywood itself.

    An even bigger Chinese deal was recently announced. Viacom's Paramount Pictures will receive a $1 billion cash investment from two Chinese film companies, Shanghai Film Group and Huahua Media, giving the U.S. studio needed seed money for future projects.

    The Wall, starring Matt Damon, currently on release in the West is a big budget CGI filled Chinese blockbuster filmed entirely in China.

    Spoiler Alert: As for La La Land, while it had good acting, directing and cinematography, the hype hid the fact it had some decent but no memorable musical numbers and a lousy ending combing elements of films "The Way We Were" and "The Last Temptation of Christ." Here we have two lovers through much of the film who in their final scene together say they will always love one another...Suddenly, we are told it's five years later and Emma Stone's character is a successful actress married to someone else and with a child. And Ryan Gosling's character is running a night club. Five years has never gone by so quickly and you may ask: What happened? It's as if the director had cut several minutes in the editing room.

    In that respect it violated an old rule, a light musical romance must have a happy ending. It began on a high and moronically and inexplicably ended on a bitter-sweet low. Yet it was honest, in that actually mirrored the real love life of Stone and the difficulty of maintaining a long-term relationship in Hollywood.

    As for the Academy Awards show, this time hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, it has long been a money making event. Even at last year's show hosted by outspoken Chris Rock and controversy over its uni-racial nominations, it brought in record advertising revenues for the ABC TV network, part of the Walt Disney entertainment conglomerate.

    This year those concerns were addressed by four nominated films based on non-white subjects. Yet in the end it doesn't really matter.

    You see, after all the speeches, protests and glam after parties, this ever growing back slapping ceremony isn't about art, aesthetics or diversity. It's all about making money. Now largely through media consolidation, of which ABC is a prime example.

    For some time news and broadcasting networks have been same bed with film studios. There are similar situations with Fox and NBC, all part of multi media conglomerates; incestuous corporate alliances vividly portrayed in the 1989 Oscar winner Network.

    Last year the average cost of a 30-second spot in the three-hour-plus telecast was about $1.9 million to $2 million, a double-digit bump versus the previous year and an all-time record, per Kantar Media figures. Only the annual Superbowl game has higher advert rates.

    Here again is where the Chinese connection could have an impact. Hollywood now makes as much or money from the international market than from domestic sales meaning the US film industry more and more is courting the European and Asian markets to sell their productions while seeking Chinese money to fund their productions.


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