Saturday, July 27, 2013

THE WAY HOME: WOMEN TALK ABOUT RACE In AMERICA!!!

the-way-home_race-in-america
Often when the topic of race is broached, we hear and read so much source material from the lens of BLACK MEN!!!

Whenever discourse surrounds social justice issues, it’s often laden with ways to save BLACK MEN and BOYS from the structural inequalities that impact OUR lives.

BUTT;  conversations about the protection of the lives of young black and non-black ‘other’ women and girls don’t seem to prompt the same sense of urgency.

In 2010, the organization, WORLD TRUST, released the Documentary Film, THE WAY HOME.

THE WAY HOME features sixty-four women, over the course of eight months, who represent a cross-section of cultures— AFRICAN AMERICAN, ARAB, ASIAN, EUROPEAN AMERICAN, JEWISH LATINA, and Bi/Multiracial — who convened to share their experiences of racism in America.

The women offer insight about Love, Assimilation, Gender, Internalized Racism, Class, Beauty Standards, their experiences Coming of Age, and so Much MORE.

WORLD TRUST says;
"In [our] work facilitating dialogues using various films that address culture and race, one of the most commonly asked questions was, “Where are the women’s voices?” In spite of the overall success of using these works, it was obvious to many that the voices of women need to be heard. ‘The Way Home’ is a celebration of the power that women’s perspectives, voices, and ways of knowing bring to the dialogue. (…) An individual story has been known to inspire a movement. A collective story has been known to liberate a people."

TIFF J from The INTERSECTION Of MADNESS & REALITY says;

"Lately I’ve been feeling embattled about being a woman writer who’s been more open about sharing my lived experience as a black woman and who’s chosen to write my opinions about race, intra-racial discrimination, gender, and even the arts from my perspective as a woman of color; as well as sharing what I’ve learned about the experiences of others navigating a similar space. On occasion, my inner dialogue asks: “Why do you even bother? People don’t want to read what black women have to say. They don’t want to pay you for your voice either,” and often wonder if I’m in over my head; because it’s one thing to live certain experiences, but spilling open about them can be equally as exasperating.

And if I had a dollar for every message or comment I receive telling me to qualify my statements to underscore or centralize (black) manhood and white womanhood over my own, whenever I post or express my opinion about the importance of self-love,self-care as a black woman, and why [I] need intersectional feminism in my life—lest I come off as a divisive misandrist—I’d probably be lying on a beach in The Maldives, retired.

I consider how so many of us struggle to be heard and to have our voices added to the overall framework during discussions about race and gender, because those issues impact women of color just as deeply, not to mention the other sub-layers of shit we have to side-step: Colorism, sexism, grappling for control over our reproductive rights, oppressive silencing, and just being largely ignored (or ridiculed) in the totality of the feminist movement. Constantly being on the defensive takes its toll after an extended period of time."
-CCG
 

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